How To: Identify if you have aphids and webworms on mesquites

Identify if you have aphids and webworms on mesquites

The video shows how to effectively be aware and get rid of possible webworms or aphids on your mesquites so they won't get damaged later. Here, John White invited Annete Peterson to show how to do so. She starts by informing from what she saw that many mesquites from her neighborhood have deformed leaves and mainly several of them have stripped branches at the tips of the trees. He explains that one of the problems is a webworm on the leaf of the mesquite, and it eats the leaves of the plant causing it to be damaged or even dead, in which case he says that it can be controlled by bio control or chemical control. Then Mrs. Annete says that one of the neighbors had brought to her a japonica and it had green leaves, nothing to do with the original. John just told her to solve the problem by cutting of the branch with all the green leaves and that should take care of it. Next, out of her own yard, Annete brings over her Desert Bird of Paradise, telling us that it was kind of yellow, adding that it was against a wall with a lot of sun towards it. John identified the problem right away, teaching that too much heat on the plant plus no water on it could cause that, also he said that she should check on the root to see if it's damaged or so. A proof of it: Annete added that she recently added water on the plant, so that's when the new growth came out. Next we have a Mexican Bush Sage, which by the details of the lady, it was beautiful and had purple blooms on it and apparently last year it began to get dry and all dead. The problem is revealed by the roots, since they were so damaged already, possibly by rocks since the plant was dug out of the ground, caused some root growth problem. This is probably by some sort of disease, which can be tested at the lab, with a diagnosis. And that's how John solved the problems of Mrs. Annete. End of video

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